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THURSDAY MAY. 19

 

4:00PM-6:00PM

 

Happy Hour with IPAL (sponsored by EBSCO)

      Pre-Conference

At Big City we purchase local meats and greens whenever possible to support our local farmers. Our dine-in and online ordering options make dining with us easy! We are conveniently located in the Capital Square Building in Downtown Des Moines, and offer lunch Monday through Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The Big City indoor and outdoor space is available for evening and weekend rentals – our CateringDSM team is happy to assist you in answering any of your special event questions.

Venue - Big City Burgers & Greens

 

6:30PM-8:30PM

 

Dine Around

      Dine-Around

Please contact Pam ([email protected]) if you have questions.

Add your name to the list!

  • These reservations are for the evening of Thursday, May 19th. Please sign up by May 9th so that reservations may be confirmed with each restaurant. ILA-ACRL planners will make these reservations for you so please submit your preferences early.
  • To sign up for a restaurant, please enter your name, the name of your institution, and your phone number or email address.
  • There are extra restaurants listed at the bottom. Feel free to explore these as well, but be warned that some of these establishments do not take reservations.
  • There are 6 slots for each restaurant. You may add more but our aim is to keep each reservation below 8 people. (All reservations will be for 6 p.m. or later.)
  • Please do not edit anything else in the document.

 

Venue - Various Restaurants (Des Moines & Ankeny)

 

FRIDAY MAY. 20

 

8:00AM-8:30AM

 

Registration

      Registration

Venue - Lobby

 

8:45AM-9:00AM

 

Welcome

      Welcome

Introduction - Sara Scheib, ILA/ACRL President Welcome - Dr. Laurie Wolf, Executive Dean, Student Services, Des Moines Area Community College 

Venue - Room 106

 

9:00AM-9:45AM

 

Opening Keynote

      Keynote

In recent years, academic librarians have recognized and responded to the reality that university, college, and community college libraries cannot afford to march to the tune of their own drummer.  They must, at least in part, keep in step with the missions, priorities, and values of their institutions.  Academic libraries are a part of their overarching institutions, and if they wish to remain important (or regain their importance) in that context, they must 1) ascertain the most important and most influential goals of their key stakeholders, be they students, parents, communities, faculty, administrators, resource allocators, or accreditors; 2) align those goals with library services and resources; 3) determine the degree to which existing services and resources contribute to those goals; 4) consider ways to increase library service and resource impact on those goals by doing something better or differently; 5) and communicate their efforts and successes to those who need or want to know the library’s value to institutional missions.  Although this process might appear lengthy and difficult, it need not be.  Academic librarians can leverage their campus awareness, professional expertise, and commitment to improvement to take small, specific, concrete, and meaningful steps to connect library services and resources to priorities and values of their institutions.  Join us for a lively presentation and discussion that will inspire “take home” ideas and strategies you can implement at your own library.

 

Speakers

Megan Oakleaf
Associate Professor of Library and Information Science in the iSchool at Syracuse University, Syracuse University
In recent years, academic librarians have recognized and responded to the reality that university, college, and community college libraries cannot afford to march to the tune of their own drummer. They must, at least in part, keep in step with the missions, priorities, and values of their institutions. Academic libraries are a part of their overarching institutions, and if they wish to remain important (or regain their importance) in that context, they must ascertain the most important and most influential goals of their key stakeholders, be they students, parents, communities, faculty, administrators, resource allocators, or accreditors; align those goals with library services and resources; determine the degree to which existing services and resources contribute to those goals; consider ways to increase library service and resource impact on those goals by doing something better or differently; and communicate their efforts and successes to those who need or want to know the library's value to institutional missions. Although this process might appear lengthy and difficult, it need not be. Academic librarians can leverage their campus awareness, professional expertise, and commitment to improvement to take small, specific, concrete, and meaningful steps to connect library services and resources to priorities and values of their institutions. Join us for a lively presentation and discussion that will inspire "take home" ideas and strategies you can implement at your own library.

Venue - TBA

 

9:45AM-10:15AM

 

Business Meeting

      Business Meeting

Venue - TBA

 

10:15AM-10:30AM

 

Break

      Food

Venue - Lobby

 

10:30AM-11:30AM

 

Free the Bound Periodicals: Metrics, Measuring, and Muscle to Transform the Library

      Concurrent Morning Session

College catalogs and campus tour guides often describe the library in terms of number of volumes, but can the focus on these numbers get in the way? In an era of electronic resources and digital scholarship, these numbers are not adequate for describing a collection much less the full breadth of services offered by the library. Should we focus on different numbers or should we simply move beyond numbers?

At our small liberal arts college, we believe a frequently-used collection and space that support student learning is far more important than having the largest, most extensive collection possible. Consequently,we are transforming our library – the space, services, and collection – to serve our students in ways most consistent with institutional values in a residential liberal arts environment.

This session will describe the process of this transformation and how we selected, collected, and used data in our decision making. It will discuss the importance of collaboration with both campus and consortial partners in bringing about the changes as well as the stronger relationships that have developed. Finally, it will reveal the results of our initial assessment efforts as the main aspects of these changes near their completion.

 

Speakers

Mary Anderson
, Central College

Venue - TBA

 

 

Guerilla Open Access: What Does It Mean for Academic Libraries?

      Concurrent Morning Session

In 2008, Aaron Swartz wrote the Guerrilla Open Access Manifesto, which stated information should be freely accessible and that those who are privileged to have access to the scholarly record – students, scientists, and librarians – have a duty to share this access with the rest of the world. In 2011, a graduate student in Kazakhstan grew frustrated with her inability to access the articles she needed for her own research. Alexandra Elbakyan created a website that didn’t so much put a ladder over publisher paywalls as it blew a hole through them. The website she created, Sci-Hub, and its partner site LibGen, have gone a long way towards fulfilling Swartz’s vision by offering access to over 48 million pirated scientific papers.

These services have been compared to Napster and the file sharing networks that decimated music sales and forced the music industry to find a new business model. Seeing a threat to its own business model and 30% profit margins, Reed Elsevier has taken to the courts to seal the breach in its paywall and shut Sci-Hub and LibGen down.

This presentation will provide an overview of Guerrilla Open Access, including the people and groups involved, current legal action, and possible impacts this may have on academic libraries and scholarly publishing.

 

Speakers

Curtis Brundy
, Wartburg College

Venue - TBA

 

 

Making We Time: Supporting the Institutional Mission and Each Other

      Concurrent Morning Session

Academic librarians encounter many challenges as we balance competing responsibilities within limited time. We share many of the obligations of teaching faculty as we contribute to the missions of our institutions, but with the unique day-to-day public service orientation of library work.

This panel will highlight our work as four librarians on the tenure track. We came to our library from diverse backgrounds and previous jobs, and our research interests are similarly diffuse. Individually, we felt isolated by our specific research agendas and externally defined expectations. Carving out space for our own long-term, professionally significant work was difficult when patrons and colleagues were literally always at our doors.

To re-prioritize our time and better balance our contributions, we created a peer support group that draws from both the writing groups common to teaching faculty and the professional learning communities (PLCs) that exist in K-12 education. As a writing group, we set aside time to work on our research and hold one another accountable for reaching our scholarly goals and timelines. As a PLC, we are able to pool our expert knowledge around research, teaching, and other areas of librarianship. We informally offer career and research advice; we teach each other new skills; we challenge and motivate each other; and provide an external sense of accountability for one another. We are also able to provide perspective and reality checks as we each seek to strike a sustainable work/life balance.

We believe that this model is adaptable to other academic libraries, whether or not librarians have faculty status and tenure-track positions. It could also work across institutions through our subdivision’s support. In addition to explaining our model, we will review published discussions of similar peer support networks and discuss ways in which attendees could modify our ideas for their own circumstances.

 

Speakers

Anne Marie Gruber
Instruction & Liaison Librarian, University of Northern Iowa
I am a librarian at UNI & my area of research focuses on library support of academic service learning. Specifically I am investigating faculty perceptions of the library's role in preparing students for service learning projects.

Angie Cox
, University of Northern Iowa

Angela Pratesi
Fine & Performing Arts Librarian, University of Northern Iowa

Katelyn Browne
, University of Northern Iowa

Venue - TBA

 

 

Research Literacy in Response to Assessment in Action and the ACRL Framework

      Concurrent Morning Session

As part of the first cohort of ACRL’s Assessment in Action program, Grinnell Libraries studied the effectiveness of research literacy instruction on our campus. In order to carry out this research, Librarians worked with faculty and classes in each of the College’s three academic divisions. We will discuss how the research was carried out, the goals, the challenges, the findings, and the recommendations; how we are now disseminating the findings on campus and seeking feedback and additional partnership from faculty; and how the results of the research are guiding our current and future teaching.

The research and our recommendations were influenced by the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. We will discuss the Framework in the context of our research project and how it fits into Grinnell’s learning goals for students. We will provide examples of how we are incorporating the Framework into class sessions and other Library communication efforts.

Please join us for a discussion of the research, the Framework, and what this could mean for how our students learn research literacy.

 

Speakers

Julia Bauder
, Grinnell College

Kevin Engel
, Grinnell College

Phil Jones
, Grinnell College

Venue - TBA

 

11:30AM-1:00PM

 

Lunch & Awards

      Food

Lunch Research Award Legacy Awards Conference Scholarship Winner 

Venue - Room 107

 

1:00PM-1:45PM

 

bepress Presentation

      bepress or Unconference

Venue - TBA

 

 

Unconference

      bepress or Unconference

Venue - TBA

 

1:45PM-2:00PM

 

Break

      Food

Venue - Lobby

 

2:00PM-2:50PM

 

Be a Collaborator! Committing to Cross-Campus Initiatives

      Concurrent Session - Afternoon 1

What do Student Development and Academic Affairs have in common when it comes to student learning? The answer at our small liberal arts college is, everything. Through the Integrated Learning initiative, our college has created a unique structure and strategies to support student learning in all aspects of their college lives. Does the library have a role to play in all this? Our library has responded with a resounding, yes, creating and implementing a new position, Integrated Learning Librarian.

Through the perspectives four of key figures, representatives from Academic Affairs and Student Development, the Library Director, and the Integrated Learning Librarian, this session will tell the exciting story of these new partnerships, recounting the successes, challenges, and unexpected benefits.

 

Speakers

Beth McMahon
Director of GeiselrLibrary, Central College
Excited to be a candidate for IA-ACRL Vice President/President Elect

Mary Anderson
, Central College

Charles Strey
, Central College

Leslie Duinink
, Central College

Venue - TBA

 

 

Goalstorming: Aligning the Strategic Plan with Staff Values

      Concurrent Session - Afternoon 1

Strategic planning is often seen as a top-down process, resulting in a document that sits on the shelf gathering dust while the real work of the library carries on. How can library leaders create a document that is truly representative of the library staff’s goals and priorities?

At our institution, we used an activity called “goalstorming” to engage library staff in the process of drafting goal statements for the strategic plan. First, potential goal statements were collected from various sources and classified according to four broad themes or “pillars”, corresponding to the University’s strategic plan. Then, library staff from all departments and classifications were invited to participate in a simple sorting activity. Each staff member was given a selection of goal statements for each pillar and were asked to sort the statements by importance to the library mission. They were also invited to cut and paste to edit the potential goal statements or create new goal statements from scratch. They could participate in all four pillar stations or select the one(s) most relevant to them.

The strategic planning group then collected the responses and fed them into a survey tool for analysis. The result was a clear indication of staff perceptions of the importance of each goal statement, within the context of each pillar. This information was used to draft the strategic plan goal statements, intended to be representative of and relevant to the goals and priorities of our library staff.

For our presentation, we will introduce the concept and lead attendees in a goalstorming exercise to establish a sense of their goals for attending the session. Our presentation will then be centered on meeting the attendees’ goals. Generally, we will share the details of goalstorming in our strategic planning process, the challenges we faced, and the outcomes.

 

Speakers

Sara Scheib
Sciences Reference & Instruction Librarian, University of Iowa Science Library
Sara Scheib has worked as the Sciences Reference & Instruction Librarian at the University of Iowa Sciences Library since 2012 and has also worked in public and community college libraries. Sara is currently serving as Vice President/President-Elect of ILA/ACRL and is also involved in various committees in the Instruction and Science & Technology Sections of ACRL. Her professional interests include research data management and learning theory.

Bethany Davis
Digital Processing Coordinator Librarian, University of Iowa Libraries

Lisa Gardinier
, University of Iowa

Venue - TBA

 

 

Installing One Button Studios at the University of Iowa Libraries: Is There an “Easy” Button for This?

      Concurrent Session - Afternoon 1

During the fall semester of 2015, the University of Iowa Libraries installed video recording studios at two library locations, the Main Library and Hardin Library for the Health Sciences. These studios, called One Button Studios, are easy-to-use recording studios based on hardware setup configuration and freely available software developed by Pennsylvania State University. These studios allow users to record a presentation to a flash drive at the touch of a button, eliminating the need for time-consuming setup or prior experience with video recording. Each studio is fitted with a high-quality camera and microphone, professional lighting, and green screen, which produce polished video recordings. Installation was not without road blocks, including hardware and software failures immediately after opening to skepticism from internal staff trained to use the space. During this session, presenters will share experiences with setting up and marketing these studios, as well as examples of the possibilities the One Button Studios offer for collaboration across campus.

Speakers

Liz Kiscaden
, University of Iowa

Brittney Thomas
Learning Commons Coordinator, University of Iowa

Venue - TBA

 

2:00PM-3:00PM

 

Research Labs: A Hybrid Format to Enable Deeper Learning, Assessments, and Engagement of Digital Natives

      Concurrent Session - Afternoon 1

This session will detail the Research Lab format, an exciting new way to talk about information literacy integration with professors that builds on formats already established as effective (hybrid, flipped classrooms, and targeted, pre-assessed instruction).

The Research Lab format consists of a series of lessons (in-person or video), each of which has a related assignment (simple or complex), that build towards a deeper understanding of information literacy skills and concepts directly related to a course activity (paper, project, etc). At some point, assignments are assessed by the librarian or professor, and this assessment is used to directly interact with students at their point of understanding. The outcomes of the Research Labs for that particular course are embedded into the related course activity, usually as a section on the grading rubric, thus underlining the importance of information literacy to the students’ learning—a reflection of the college’s mission, common learning outcomes, and general education plan.

Research Labs increase students’ information literacy skills and comprehension, of huge value to both librarians and professors, by removing several common problems with information literacy instruction:

• information overload from one-shot-format sessions,

• lack of accountability for student learning from less integrated formats,

• the inability of more traditional formats to accommodate those with differently-paced learning styles,

• and logistical issues of building in-person lessons into the physical course meeting time more than once.

Research Labs also give librarians a little naming cache, in that students already associate the idea of a “lab” with hands-on learning that reinforces, and is in addition to, the lecture portion of the class.

Data will be shown indicating an increase in student information literacy skills and concepts comprehension after Research Lab implementation in two courses.

ILA/ACRL attendees will learn the nuts and bolts of implementing this stimulating new integrated format which they can begin to directly apply in their own information literacy education work.

 

Speakers

Jill Westen
, Wartburg College

Venue - TBA

 

3:00PM-3:45PM

 

Creating New Paths for Visual Learners: An Embedded Librarian’s Journey in Art History Instruction

      Concurrent Session - Afternoon 2

What does an embedded librarian look like at a 21st century liberal arts institution? Knowledge of Jay Z, the latest Internet memes, and selfie culture were all fair game in this Art History course!

Come explore a three years’ journey into the heart of collaborative teaching an Art History Seminar course. The Seminar course, essentially a capstone course for Art History majors, has a large focus on the research process, culminating with the authoring of a thesis in a student’s senior year.

Many of these students have been primarily visual learners, which gave the opportunity to alter our research instruction to include creative means of furthering the research process. Mind maps were drawn, both in Sharpie and digitally, and we were on our way. A survey of citation managers showed the joy of organizing documents and multimedia, and data visualization workshops taught students to present their research in new and fresh ways. All along the way, ACRL Visual Literacy Competency Standards, along with the more well- known ACRL Information Literacy Standards, were implemented.

We’ll discuss the challenges and wins of a first-time collaboration of this sort on a small liberal arts campus. Challenges faced included meeting students where they were at with regards to their experience with research, developing a rapport with students and co-instructors, and coping with a professor away for the year in Florence, Italy! Witnessing new and innovative ways of gathering and disseminating information were highlights every year. Finally, we’ll also explore strategies for scaling the project into a larger course and across disciplines.

 

Speakers

Laura Riskedahl
, Coe College

Venue - TBA

 

 

It Takes a Crowd: Library Crowdfunding to Support University Initiatives

      Concurrent Session - Afternoon 2

The University’s faculty assigns many collaborative projects to students. The library supports this by creating learning environments which encourage group learning. In summer 2015 we were approached by the University Foundation to pilot a fundraising campaign using their crowdfunding platform. We researched potential projects and chose one from campus IT: a Microsoft Surface Hub. The Surface Hub allows groups to share information, videoconference, annotate presentations, save them and take them with them. Acquiring this technology would allow the library and University to achieve their curricular and student engagement goals. Representatives from across the library formed a planning committee to develop the 30-day campaign’s marketing, social media and stewardship plans. A cornerstone of the campaign was a crowdfunding video, “Quest for the Surface Hub,” enticing donors to give. A company led by a campus faculty member and employing University students produced the video and library student assistants and staff starred in it. Students and faculty from across campus provided testimonials. University Relations developed supporting graphics and donor postcards. A kick-off event and video viewing party was staged for library staff and student assistants to garner support for the project. The library staff was mobilized: liaison librarians shared campaign information with their faculty; staff performed research to track down retirees and former library employees; and student assistants were encouraged to share information over social media. The campaign raised $8,622, surpassing the $7,500 goal a day before its close. The campaign’s alignment with University curriculum, the collaboration with campus faculty, the University Foundation, IT, University Relations, and the work of the library staff made the campaign a success. Session attendees will learn how to initiate successful crowdfunding campaigns at their own institutions, including the effective engagement of library staff and campus stakeholders in planning and implementing the campaign.

Speakers

Melinda Beland
, University of Northern Iowa

Chris Cox
, University of Northern Iowa

Rob Green
, University of Northern Iowa

Venue - TBA

 

 

Learning in Public: Placing Resources and Activities Out Into the Everyday Paths of Students and Community Members

      Concurrent Session - Afternoon 2

In this session presenters will describe their experience organizing library outreach and engagement projects particularly enlivened and uniquely supported by a university theme semester program. To provide context, the presenters describe characteristics of a social justice theme semester run on their campus that enriched and inspired the development of two unique library projects and accompanying assessments. The first project was developed after seeing a need for librarians to be out in the community and for students to gain firsthand experience with the communities with which they will be working. In response, the Librarians for Social Justice group was formed. Since its inception, the group has been involved with fundraising for libraries in Cambodia, starting a book group at a local halfway house, and assisting with programming surrounding the social justice themed semester.

The second project evolved based on evidence-based assessment and research exploring the needs and interests of college students. In response, a series of pop-up events was designed to expand student learning beyond the classroom. The pop-up events took place in high-traffic locations around campus and featured recommended reading, information about upcoming campus and community events, and activities that motivated and guided student engagement with library materials. Pop-up event materials rotated weekly and explored broad themes related to known theme semester course content and events.

Placing resources and activities out into the everyday paths of students provided opportunities to reach underserved student populations, to bolster the learning already happening in classrooms, and to encourage student curiosity and discovery. Session attendees will learn ways to strategically and creatively engage broad campus initiatives and events, identify strategies for connecting with community partners, engage students with uncomfortable issues in a safe space, and assess the community impact of engagement and outreach projects.

 

Speakers

Katie Hassman
Undergraduate Engagement Librarian, University of Iowa

Kelly Grogg
, University of Iowa

Venue - TBA

 

3:00PM-11:30PM

 

When Students Are the Face of Service: Assessing Circulation Student Employees’ Skills, Service, and Successful Training

      Concurrent Session - Afternoon 2

College libraries often depend heavily on the competency of their student employees for a well-run facility. Assessing this competency, particularly in circulation student employees, and then making positive changes based on the results is vital to maintaining the integrity of the library’s public service. “When Students are the Face of Service: Assessing circulation student employees’ skills, service, and successful training” will detail the assessment procedure of our newly-hired Circulation Assistants (the title of our student employees in circulation), with some advice for others interested in similar assessments.

On an additional note, as part of the ongoing institutional procedures of our college, every department on campus must assess two internal aspects each academic year. The assessment of our Circulation Assistants shows our library joining in with the broader initiative of the college—one of this year’s themes.

In order to assess new Circulation Assistants’ ability to understand and perform required circulation tasks, two librarians presented each of the new student Circulation Assistants with four practice scenarios during their shifts—roughly eight weeks after their initial 2-day training orientation. The results revealed that Circulation Assistants struggled with more complex or irregular tasks, both in knowledge and continuation of good customer service; this indicated a need for ongoing training in these more complex tasks and in the particulars of good customer service.

ILA/ACRL conference attendees will recognize many of the issues inherent in circulation student employees. Through watching the presentation of the assessment and demonstration of the practice scenarios, attendees will learn how to select scenarios that test appropriate and different skills, understand how to best enact the scenarios, and share ideas about their own experiences in assessing student employees.

 

Speakers

Ashley McHose
Information Literacy Librarian, Wartburg College
As an academic liaison librarian, Ashley enjoys serving students by teaching critical information literacy skills through embedded class sessions, in-depth one-on-one consultations, and group sessions. She also serves as the Library Student Employee Coordinator, responsible for developing Vogel Library's Student Employee Program in order to increase professional development opportunities in the student workplace.

Jill Westen
, Wartburg College

Venue - TBA

 

4:00PM-4:15PM

 

Final Wrap-Up

      Registration

Snacks for the road, turn in evaluations

Venue - Room 106

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