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ILA/ACRL Spring Conference 2010
“The Library is Open: Open Minds, Open Doors, Open Access”


Friday, April 23, 2010

Kirkwood Center for Continuing Education

Kirkwood Community College, Cedar Rapids, IA

 


Conference Schedule and Session Abstracts

Thursday, April 22

6:00pm

Pre-Conference Social

The Colony Inn 

Casual dinner and drinks at The Colony Inn, with meals and drinks to be paid individually by attendees.

Friday, April 23

8:30—9:00am

Registration

Lobby

9:00—9:15am

Welcome & Introduction

  • Beth McMahon - Chair, Spring Conference Planning Committee, Central College
  • Mary Iber - ILA/ACRL President, Cornell College
  • Dr. Mick Starcevich, President, Kirkwood Community College

 

 

Conference Suite D&E

9:15—10:15am

Keynote Address

Read/Write Culture: What Open Means                   for Learning, Research and Creativity

  • Barbara Fister, Academic Librarian,                      Gustavus Adolphus College

10:15—10:45am

Break

Lobby

10:45—11:30am

Session A

 

11:30am—1:00pm

Lunch & Business Meeting

Conference Suite D&E

1:00—1:45pm

Session B

 

1:45—1:50pm

Transition Time

 

1:50—2:35pm

Session C

 

2:35—2:45pm

Mini-Break

 

2:45—3:30pm

Session D

 

 

Session A
10:45—11:30am

 

Scholarly Communication and Librarian Liaisons: Getting the Conversation Started

Karen Fischer, Collections Analysis & Planning Librarian, University of Iowa Libraries

Newsletter Article 

Session Manager:  Beth McMahon, Central College

Location: Conference Suite A

Knowledge of scholarly communication issues is becoming a skill set required of librarians who have contact with faculty and students.  Learning and teaching these complex issues takes time and effort, but there are ways to facilitate the process of empowering librarians with the information they need to be adequately knowledgeable.  This presentation, tailored to librarians who are in the planning stages of a scholarly communication program, will include an introduction to the foundations and fundamentals of setting up a program and an overview of the main areas of expertise related to scholarly communication that all academic librarians need.

 

From Information to Learning Commons: Partnering for Student Learning in Academic Libraries

Rebecca Sullivan, Assistant Professor & Academic Technology Librarian, Luther College

Newsletter Article 

Session Manager:  Sara Scheib, Kirkwood Community College

Location: Conference Suite C

As libraries have moved further along the continuum from information commons to learning commons, a review of the literature reveals case studies that embody collaborative spaces, partnerships leading to integrated service, and user-centered assessment.  Heading toward further involvement in campus-wide initiatives and an emphasis on the social dimension of learning, the learning commons will represent transformative change that extends beyond the reach of the traditional academic library.

 

Building Partnerships, Building Opportunities: Outreach, Collaboration and Service Learning Opportunities for Greener Libraries

Sarah Passonneau, Assistant Professor, Iowa State University

Newsletter Article 

Session Manager: Natalie Hutchinson, Central College

Location: Conference Suite D&E

Get ready to learn why sustainability should be a core concern for libraries.  This presentation provides the framework Iowa State University used for completing a comprehensive sustainability audit.  A QUICK overview of tips and rubrics will provide librarians with useful tools. 

 

The data from the sustainability provide a wealth of information.  Several projects developed after assessing the data. A QUICK review of projects will be touched upon that will provide practical tips for librarians.

 

The collaborative case study between a rhetoric professor, the sustainability director and the assessment librarian will show how ISU library’s sustainability audit opened doors for collaborative partnerships, service learning opportunities and student engagement.

 

Light on ETD’s : Out From the Shadows

Wendy Robertson, Digital Resources Librarian, University of Iowa Libraries

Rebecca Routh, Catalog Librarian, University of Iowa Libraries

Newsletter Article 

Session Manager: Randy Roeder, University of Iowa Libraries

Location:  Conference Suite F

Electronic theses and dissertations are beginning to replace the traditional print format with a number of benefits. Stored in the university’s institutional repository, these treasured resources are no longer hidden from view, taking up space on archival shelves. Researchers everywhere can instantly access the ETDs, whose content is easily enriched through a multitude of electronic file types. At the University of Iowa Libraries new collaborations are emerging between digital librarians and catalogers in their efforts to streamline processing. Candidate-supplied metadata gets massaged, enriched, cross-walked and recycled to appear in various guises on a multitude of platforms. Walls break down as dialogues emerge from new workflows, opening new possibilities to leverage skill sets between departments and develop new forms of cooperation.

 

Session B

1:00—1:45pm

 

The Value of the Open: Defining and Selling Openness for the Campus Community

Bruce Gilbert, Professor of Librarianship, Librarian (Director of Technology

and Instruction), Drake University

Newsletter Article 

Session Manager: TBA

Location:  Conference Suite A

“Openness” is much discussed in the literature, yet there are surprisingly few comprehensive definitions. This lack of conceptual consensus adds complexity to advocating the cause of the Open. This session will combine theory and practice. The speaker has ten years experience as both an advocate for, and manager of, Open projects. He will share lessons learned from successes and failures. Currently, he is seeking endorsement of OAI by Drake's Faculty Senate. The speaker believes libraries must “sell” Openness at every turn. What is the “business plan” of Openness? Is “Openness” a core value, at your library and institution?

 

Collocation and Collaboration: Preus Library Main Floor Makeover

Germano G. Streese, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Luther College

Ryan Gjerde, Digital Initiatives Lead, Luther College

Newsletter Article 

Session Manager:  Beth McMahon, Central College

Location: Conference Suite C

In Fall 2009 Preus Library (Luther College) unveiled a significant reorganization of its main floor, stemming from a study of service points.  Since Spring of 2006 a series of committees studied the library circulation and reference desks, and the technology help desk, all of which are located in the Library. The conclusion was that co-locating the three desks would best address goals of enhancing user experience at the desks, and encouraging collaboration among LIS staff members. The presentation will focus on the steps taken to implement the changes and implementation strategies employed in this make-over.

 

Opening Acquisitions: Letting Our Users Do the Buying

Michael Wright, Head, Acquisitions and Rapid Cataloging, University of Iowa Libraries

Newsletter Article

Session Manager:  Susan Moore, University of Northern Iowa

Location:  Conference Suite D&E

It’s unorthodox: a number of libraries nationwide are opening up their acquisitions process for ebooks and letting their users make the picks.  Known as patron-driven acquisition (PDA), the process involves working with a vendor to develop an ebook subject profile, and loading MARC records for ebooks matching the profile into the library’s catalog.   After a certain number of uses, the library owns the ebook and the vendor deducts payment from a deposit account.  There is no intervention by subject-specialist librarians or even acquisitions staff.

The University of Iowa Libraries established a PDA pilot last fall which has proven to be extremely popular with users even while it sets traditional notions of collection development upside down.  PDA has a lot of advantages, but has some potential pitfalls too, and we are literally learning as we go.   One thing is certain:  the UI Libraries are not buying ebooks that aren’t used. 

 

Let’s Get Together : Taking Advantage of the Learning Center Model

Laura Farmer, Writing Studio Director, Cornell College

Jessica Johanningmeier, Quantitative Reasoning Consultant, Cornell College

Newsletter Article 

Session Manager: TBA

Location:  Conference Suite F

While library, writing, and quantitative consultants often collaborate for instruction, there exists also the possibility to collaborate for individual and small-group student conferences. Such a collaboration results in several benefits for both the student and the consultants. We will present specific examples of courses in various disciplines in which we collaborate to create a learning atmosphere that encourages excellence in our students. Responses of students to the joint consultations will be shared.

 

Session C

1:50—2:35pm

 

Instant Openness: IM and Access to Information

Nicholas Wyant, Reference & Instruction Librarian, The University of Iowa 

Session Manager:  Susan Moore, University of Northern Iowa

Location:  Conference Suite A

Instant Messaging is increasingly available to library users and has proven to be an effective tool for librarians to give fast answers to basic questions.  Using IM is not restricted to a geographical location, therefore creating the opportunity for institutions to collaborate and offer users increased access to librarians.

 

Incorporating E-Readers into the Classroom: An Experiment

Kevin Engel, Science Librarian, Grinnell College Libraries

Amy Roberson, Reference & Instruction Librarian, Grinnell College Libraries

Newsletter Article 

Session Manager: Sara Scheib, Kirkwood Community College

Location:  Conference Suite C

Grinnell College piloted the use of Amazon.com’s Kindle DX in a first-year seminar with 12 students during fall 2009. The project relied heavily upon collaboration among curricular technology specialists, librarians, and others on campus.   During the course of the pilot, we investigated the pedagogical implications of e-readers and evaluated the ability of the Kindle DX to meet the goals of the course. This session will focus on the logistics of managing the Kindles as well as reflect on the study and areas for future investigation.

 

Library as Journal Publisher

Wendy Robertson, Digital Resources Librarian, The University of Iowa Libraries

Newsletter Article 

Session Manager: Randy Roeder, University of Iowa Libraries

Location:  Conference Suite D&E

This presentation will cover general trends and developments in journals and ways libraries can be involved in journal publishing, particularly as trusted repositories of information. Hosting journals is a good way to educate the editors about copyright and open access and scholarly communication. The presentation will cover the types of things you should consider when starting such a service and what type of support you can expect to provide. Practical examples will be given from The University of Iowa’s work with several journals, including migrating online content to a better platform, turning print only titles into online titles and also new titles.

 

 

Pushing Library Resources

Genny Yarne, Head of Reference, Kirkwood Community College

Sarah S. Uthoff, Reference Librarian, Kirkwood Community College

Newsletter Article

Session Manager:  Beth McMahon, Central College

Location: Conference Suite F

“Pushing Library Resources” - Kirkwood Community College Library has been working to improve the accessibility of library resources. We offer a look at the successes and failures we’ve experienced from a front line customer service position on the reference desk and possible pitfalls for you to look out for, successes, limitations that we’ve found, and things we are still struggling with. Our discussion will include: database selection, database training, reference services online, information literacy, delicious bookmarks, adoption of a proxy server, and the process of re-designing our library website. We will encourage others to share their stories of what has worked and not for them.

 

Session D

2:45—3:30pm

 

How Quality Collaboration Changes Everything: Exploring Partnerships between Librarians and Faculty to Embed Information Literacy in an Introductory Oral Communication Course

Kari D. Weaver, Information Literacy Librarian, Wartburg College

Dr. Penni M. Pier, Associate Professor of Communication Arts, Wartburg College

Newsletter Article 

Session Manager: Randy Roeder, University of Iowa Libraries

Location: Conference Suite A

This session explores a collaborative teaching partnership between an Information Literacy Librarian, the Director of Oral Communication Across the Curriculum, and adjunct faculty for the purpose of redesigning and delivering an embedded information literacy experience in an introductory oral communication course.  Discussion includes the structure of the class, assignment integration, course delivery, assessment techniques, and lessons learned through the process.

 

Informing the Future: Easing the Transition to College

Dan Chibnall, User Services & Instruction Design Librarian, Grand View University

Pam Rees, Director of the Library, Grand View University

Megan Tedell, Access & Instruction Librarian, Grand View University 

Session Manager: TBA

Location: Conference Suite C

Many aspects of transitioning to college are difficult for incoming freshmen, including adjusting to professors’ expectations for college-level research. At Grand View University Library, we collaborated with local high school librarians and teachers to better prepare students for this transition. By using real assignments from Grand View professors and hands-on activities, we exposed students to the resources and skills they will need to be successful in college. In our presentation we will share our instructional methods, the challenges we have faced, what we have learned from our experiences, and our goals for the future of the project.

 

Opening the Door: How Library Instruction Can Improve Student Work

Becky Canovan, Reference and Instruction Librarian, University of Dubuque

Cal Coquillette, Assistant Professor of History, University of Dubuque

Newsletter Article

Session Manager: Beth McMahon, Central College

Location: Conference Suite F

Librarians often assist with the research portion of an assignment. However, they rarely have a hand in the final product despite ACRL's Information Literacy Competency Standard 4 dedicated entirely to effective application of information.  In this presentation, we will discuss how a bit of planning and creativity can lead to better final products from students. For this to happen, faculty must be open to creative instruction, and librarians have to be comfortable stepping outside their comfort zone as "seek and find" people. Examples will include IL sessions in both sociology and history.

 

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